Thrift Haul Video – Episode 10

I started video taping my thrift store finds recently.  Okay – so I’m not all that great at it….yet!  I can get better.  I figured out how to embed a video into my blog post, so hey!  anything is possible!

Something you’re always going to see in my thrift hauls is cookie cutters.  I have cornered the market on cookie cutters.  I cannot pass by a cookie cutter. Fortunately for me, my compulsion is validated now that I have found that there is a society of cookie cutter collectors, and even a cookie cutter museum!  Here’s an interesting article about cookie cutters.  I’ll be checking out Pinterest to find ideas to display and enjoy my collection – currently, they are simply filling drawers.

It would be a rare thing indeed if I didn’t find and include some English transfer ware in my videos. They are beautiful little pieces of art!  I like all of the colours, but I hope to be able to find some purple pieces one day soon!  I’ve only seen photos, never one “in the wild”.  I was able to find out some more information about the bowl with the green transfer of the toby jug and pipe: it’s a pattern called “The Old Curiosity Shop” that was produced in the U.S. in the 50s.  From what I can determine, it only came in this green colour.  Check out eBay for a look at other images to be found on this china.  I like the clocks!  According to some posts I’ve read on other websites, this china was sold in individual pieces at A&P.  It makes me happy to know that these lovely and collectible pieces were so accessible to their first purchasers, which means that there are plenty out there for serious fanatics to find at thrift shops and estate sales and auctions!

In the video, I talked about the mark on the milk glass cream and sugar as being a “WC” – well, what I’ve since learned is that it is actually a “stacked WG” for the Westmoreland Glass company, and indicates pieces produced between the 1940s to 1960s.  Collecting milk glass has become really hot recently – though I’m not sure why.  Twenty years ago when the Jadite phenomenon happened, it was because of Martha Stewart – she and her daughter have HUGE collections!  I wonder if some celebrity decorator has been the spur for the increased interest?  Anyway – there’s lots of articles online about milk glass, and how to collect it, and values of it, and how to distinguish old milk glass from new milk glass.  I like that it’s still so easy to find inexpensive milk glass, and I’m always delighted to find an unusual piece.

I keep my office supplies in milk glass vessels on my desk at work.  Having something especially pretty to keep me organized helps me to feel like I really have got my stuff together!

According the website Pyrex Passion – my Butterfly Gold patterned mugs were produced in the mid 70s.  This website provides a comprehensive guide to identifying and dating Pyrex patterns.  The blog attached to this website is really interesting too! I recently sold two Pyrex bowls–pink Gooseberry ‘cinderella’ shaped bowls–and here is an article with beautiful photos of examples–to a collector who had to drive some way to cheerfully trade me $40 for two old bowls!  I offered to show her some other Pyrex that I had kicking around – but she ONLY wanted pink!

 

 

 

Old-fashioned Molasses Ginger Cookies

Just  before Christmas, my 100 year old Nanna took a bit of a tumble while she was fussing with her Christmas decorations–seems she tripped over a chair leg or something–and fractured her hip.  It was very scary watching her head into surgery, and a very anxious ninety minutes while we waited for the surgeon to assure us that she had come through it okay.  Fast forward a few weeks, and she celebrated her 101st birthday!  She is still in hospital, but the general consensus is, that she cannot return home.  She is up an walking, and becoming more independent (I’m telling you…this lady is a force of nature!) but now we need to turn our thoughts to packing up her household and preparing for a move to a retirement home.

The only thing I really wanted from  Nanna’s apartment was her Pyrex mixing bowls. I have nearly 50 years of food memories associated with these vibrantly coloured bowls. Mom had the yellow one too (and I have vivid flashbacks of the potato salad and scalloped potatoes served up in her’s). I have been looking for years for an affordable set of my own, but had to settle for a more modern set (on the left).

Now that I have brought home the treasured mixing bowl set, the more modern set–picture on the left–are going to youngest son’s apartment. Why? To quote him, “I have nearly 25 years of food memories in them.”

Like mother, like son.

To welcome the bowls home, I felt the need to put them to use with something old-fashioned, heart-warming, soft and comforting.  Ah yes – molasses ginger cookies.

 

Molasses Ginger Cookies

  • Difficulty: some experience
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Makes 3 Dozen Cookies

  • 2 1/4 cups flour
  • 2 tsps baking soda
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/2 tsp allspice
  • 1/2 tsp ground cloves
  • 3/4 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cut fancy molasses
  • turbinated sugar (for rolling cookies dough in before baking) – you may substitute white granulated sugar

 

Heat oven to 375 degrees, placing rack in the centre. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.

Sift flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, allspice, and cloves.

In a second bowl, cream together butter, brown sugar, egg and molasses. Beat at high speed until light and fluffy.

Stir in flour mixture. The cookie batter is going to be very stiff, so finish the final mixing with your hands.

Form balls of cookie dough by the tablespoon full, roll into sugar to cover the outside surface and place on baking sheet, one dozen at a time.  Do not press.  Bake for nine minutes and allow to cool.