Nanna’s Things

Nanna’s 100th birthday portrait – trying to look sweet and demure – a thin and false veneer for the sassy force of nature that she is!

 

My grandmother — known as  “Nanna” to EVERYBODY — until recently has lived alone in her apartment and filled her days with trips to the senior’s centre to play bridge, cheering on the Toronto Blue Jays, baking cookies, tarts, and the occasional lemon meringue pie, marathon-styled shopping trips (which would make Hannibal’s slog across the Alps seem like a cake walk) and keeping her hands busy knitting tiny hats for preemie babies and crocheting warm vests and toques for children in Afghanistan.  Stubbornly independent, she was fussing with her Christmas decorations a few weeks before the holidays, and tripped on a chair leg, fracturing her hip.  This is where I should probably mention: she’s 101 years old!

Surgery went surprisingly well – – I’m sure it was an unprecedented success for the young surgeon. But it was clear that she would not be able to return to solo flight in her apartment, and an extremely difficult and emotionally challenging move to a retirement home happened just this week.

 

Nanna on her 100th birthday flashing gang signs with me and Tim – one of the many great-grandsons

All of this has meant that a lifetime of belongings had to be broken up in a shockingly rapid pace in order to empty her apartment and comply with her demands wishes.  In the ‘first round’ of picks, I chose the Pyrex mixing bowl set (which I discussed in this blog post) and in the ‘second round’ I brought home the items pictured above.

I sorted out another box of things that I would like to bring home – though I left it in the apartment with a note that “Nancy would like to have these if no one else wants them”. It includes pieces of glass and china.  I’m also hoping to be the one to get the hutch from her dining room. But with eight grandchildren, and uncountable numbers of great-grandchildren, and yes, a burgeoning tribe of great-great-grandchildren, I know that I need to be gracious and share.

There was a very brief and minor squabble over the washing board – not even worth mentioning, except to highlight the extent to which these humble items are precious to us.

Next was the Yorkshire Pudding tins – so called, because nothing else was ever made in them.  I have never had a better Yorkshire Pudding than those that popped out from Nanna’s oven. I’m thinking I should probably get the secret recipe while I still can!

The teeny-tiny star cookie cutter in the centre of the photo cut the top crust of itsy-bitsy mincemeat tarts baked every year in  the dozens and dozens she would  share with her family – a favourite gift being a Christmassy tin full of “Nanna Cookies”.  Nanna believes that miniature cookies are more genteel and therefore the optimal size in all cases – which is sufficient explanation for the set of six nearly microscopic cookie cutters shown pictured in their box.  She also maintains that there is far too much sweetness in everything – I can’t bear to reveal to my deluded family that the secret recipe for her famous chocolate chip cookies came from the back of a Chip-its package with the measurements for sugar slashed to 50%. And of course, the chocolate chips must be semi-sweet, not full on sweet!

I suspect that these beliefs about cookies have been one of the contributing factors to her longevity – and I’m not referring to dietary restraint here, specifically – no, I think the lesson her is: we should take delight in even very small pleasures, make diligent efforts to share with everyone around us, and to create lasting memories with our loved ones.

 

 

 

Vintage Glass: Identified

I’m pretty good a recognizing a quality piece of vintage glass, but I’m not very good at identifying it.  I just can’t even begin to figure out what search terms to use.  I mean…it’s glass, right?  And it’s …umm….. yeah, I don’t know.

I enjoy watching Michelle Levinson of Thrifting 101 on YouTube and I’m amazed by how she can identify the manufacturer and date of origin, and even an approximate value. I’m sure it’s the result of hours of study and research, but she makes it look effortless. Luckily for me, I found a Facebook group dedicated to vintage glass identification, and I am watching–and more importantly learning–in the back ground.

 

 

 

 

Last Friday I picked up a beautiful piece of glass at the Thrift on Kent for $1, and I just knew it was a great pick! But I have knowledge of the details – maker, date, value.  So I posted a few photos of my find (and a few other recent picks) and this is what I’ve learned.  It’s 6.25″ across. Imperial Lace Edge no. 7455B Belled Nappy, Blue Opalescent, early 1930s.  Hazel Marie Weatherman , author of Colored Glassware of the Depression Era, called this pattern Sugar Cane. It came in several colours: Amber, Crystal, Ritz Blue, Green Opalescent, and Green

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

This ruffled bowl is 5.75″ tall, and about 6.75″ across. It has an iridescent sheen to it. There are no discernible markings. The good folks on Facebook identified it as  Hearts and Flowers pattern by Northwood in pearl iridescent glass, circa 1912.

 

 

This is marked Fenton. 7.5″ tall, and 6.25″ across. I had it filled with glittering Christmas balls as part of my holiday decor.  I paid $2 for it at a thrift store. It is a no. 9222 CG Comport. Since it has a logo, it likely would have been made in 1972 or 1973. 1973 is the last year these were produced. This pattern was a copy of the Tiffin/US Glass “Rose” line. Frank Fenton had new molds made when he discovered the pattern and fell in love with it. It was originally called “Roses” but later catalogues called it Rose. The colour is “Colonial Green” – sooooo 1970s!

 

No markings that I can detect. 6.5″ wide, 3″ tall. This diamond shaped compote is by Indiana Glass in “Pineapple and Floral”.  I saw a photo of the same piece in milk glass…I waaaaant one!

 

This is black with no markings I can detect. 3.5″ across, 3″ tall.  Hazel Atlas produced this depression glass pattern in the mid-1930s under the name of Cloverleaf. The major pattern has a band of three-leaf clovers encircling each piece. Here’s a link to the official Hazel Atlas website.  This sherbet bowl came in several colours: green, yellow, and pink.

 

 Overall, 5.5″ across and about 2.5″ high. A member of the identification group commented: “This looks to be Anchor Hocking Vitrock, aka Flower Rim. From the 1930s.” This helpful opinion gave me enough information to do some more research.  This creamer is Vitrock by Hocking Glass, and was made between 1934-1937, making it authentic Depression Glass.