Vintage Glass: Identified

I’m pretty good a recognizing a quality piece of vintage glass, but I’m not very good at identifying it.  I just can’t even begin to figure out what search terms to use.  I mean…it’s glass, right?  And it’s …umm….. yeah, I don’t know.

I enjoy watching Michelle Levinson of Thrifting 101 on YouTube and I’m amazed by how she can identify the manufacturer and date of origin, and even an approximate value. I’m sure it’s the result of hours of study and research, but she makes it look effortless. Luckily for me, I found a Facebook group dedicated to vintage glass identification, and I am watching–and more importantly learning–in the back ground.

 

 

 

 

Last Friday I picked up a beautiful piece of glass at the Thrift on Kent for $1, and I just knew it was a great pick! But I have knowledge of the details – maker, date, value.  So I posted a few photos of my find (and a few other recent picks) and this is what I’ve learned.  It’s 6.25″ across. Imperial Lace Edge no. 7455B Belled Nappy, Blue Opalescent, early 1930s.  Hazel Marie Weatherman , author of Colored Glassware of the Depression Era, called this pattern Sugar Cane. It came in several colours: Amber, Crystal, Ritz Blue, Green Opalescent, and Green

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

This ruffled bowl is 5.75″ tall, and about 6.75″ across. It has an iridescent sheen to it. There are no discernible markings. The good folks on Facebook identified it as  Hearts and Flowers pattern by Northwood in pearl iridescent glass, circa 1912.

 

 

This is marked Fenton. 7.5″ tall, and 6.25″ across. I had it filled with glittering Christmas balls as part of my holiday decor.  I paid $2 for it at a thrift store. It is a no. 9222 CG Comport. Since it has a logo, it likely would have been made in 1972 or 1973. 1973 is the last year these were produced. This pattern was a copy of the Tiffin/US Glass “Rose” line. Frank Fenton had new molds made when he discovered the pattern and fell in love with it. It was originally called “Roses” but later catalogues called it Rose. The colour is “Colonial Green” – sooooo 1970s!

 

No markings that I can detect. 6.5″ wide, 3″ tall. This diamond shaped compote is by Indiana Glass in “Pineapple and Floral”.  I saw a photo of the same piece in milk glass…I waaaaant one!

 

This is black with no markings I can detect. 3.5″ across, 3″ tall.  Hazel Atlas produced this depression glass pattern in the mid-1930s under the name of Cloverleaf. The major pattern has a band of three-leaf clovers encircling each piece. Here’s a link to the official Hazel Atlas website.  This sherbet bowl came in several colours: green, yellow, and pink.

 

 Overall, 5.5″ across and about 2.5″ high. A member of the identification group commented: “This looks to be Anchor Hocking Vitrock, aka Flower Rim. From the 1930s.” This helpful opinion gave me enough information to do some more research.  This creamer is Vitrock by Hocking Glass, and was made between 1934-1937, making it authentic Depression Glass.

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